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The Imaginative Perspective in Video Games

The Imaginative Perspective in Video Games

Playing video games is always a favorite past time of mine. I love to play video games for the long intriguing story with branching story arcs. With the multiple story arcs, it allows for the game to replayability in order to view all the different branching storylines. Some video games allow for an infinite possibility of story arcs, but still hitting the same main points like in the Elder Scrolls series. Even though you can have two different characters, they both could experience the story line on different days which equate to the different non-playable characters (NPCs) in different places. Also, there is so much more do to rather than the story arc. By doing the extra content first there are points in the story line that will add extra dialog options. So in the case of completing the main story arc in Sovngarde, there are extra dialog options for each leader position that your character is in the guilds.  

Playing the different story arcs are fun, but once they are all done, I originally would've thought that the game was over and unplayable for another time. I was very much wrong because with the more advanced games that we have now, a new perspective comes into play: the other NPC perspectives. The games for today are so advanced that the NPC around are having their own story arcs going on. Some will go off to battle to prove to themselves and to their families that they are strong and competent. Others will try to make a shop for themselves and be a market trader to death. Also with them having their own story lines, the story lines could intersect the player's character sometimes resulting in a questline. The NPCs will also react to the player's character with a cycled dialog line, but it is the imagination of such for when there isn't a reaction that makes the game that much better. Such as the NPC reaction when the player character is fast traveling. It is argued on what occurs when the player character fast travels, whether it be teleportation or in a state much like that of the 'auto state' shown by the movie "Click" where the person is calm and unresponsive. 

In the open world type games, the player's character is soon to be heard about amongst the land and the people that inhabit it either in a famous or infamous way. Seeing the player's character could strike fear or bring emotions of flutter to the people that they stumble upon. When I get really bored in an open world game like Skyrim, I would save the game, fast travel to a location and then go insane by killing everyone and everything that I see. I have a video on YouTube showing such things as I destroyed Rorikstead because I was bored. Imagine the reactions of the NPCs that are in the game. Off in the distance, they see the hero that they have heard about walking diligently towards them, then once reaching the city/destination limit, the character stands in place for a moment, pulls out a weapon and murders little Susie because she came to greet the hero. Poor little Susie. Families being sliced in half and the guards are pinned to a wall with arrows. Screams of the remaining alive NPC running and cowering away hoping that the hero will forget about them and move on, but eventually get found and beaten to death like little Susie. After the hero is done, he returns to the standing position on the city limits and Little Susie comes to greet him, showing that the hero has the ability to revert time to before he went into a blood frenzy. 

When I play Skyrim or other open world RPGs that give me the ability to kill other NPCs, I choose a calling card such as a flower or other common item. For a few of my characters in Skyrim, I would kill someone and put a Nightshade flower on them. One time, my calling card was a carrot because carrots are pretty common in the game. Another time, I played as a character that didn't want to kill anyone but ended up doing so anyway. He would feel so bad about doing it that he would put gold on the body as repayment for killing the person.

It is fun to wonder what the NPCs are thinking when the player character is traversing through the map like an insane person. For example, I am currently playing Final Fantasy XV and the main character has the ability to teleport roughly 100 ft and probably 120ft on a direct point. So as my character enters a town, he keeps teleporting from spot to spot without any hesitation or concern of what everyone else thinks in the town. Also, his boy band like squad has to follow behind him as well and find him every time he teleports.  In some cities in the game, magic and sprinting isn't allowed, so, therefore, I cannot teleport; however, I did recently learn that the developers of the game didn't reduce the jumping distance as well when in a city. Therefore my character can jump as far and as quick as he can in the open plains as he can in the city, thus making it the faster form of transportation. Wouldn't be a weird sight to see someone jumping around in a city because it was the fastest mode of transportation? 

Playing video games with this added perspective makes every game more enjoyable. All the different times our horse, Roach, in the Witcher 3 gets called in, he can end up messing up horribly. There were so many glitches with Roach that the company, CD Projekt Red, themselves embrace the glitches. They created a card in their new game of Gwent that shows multiple times in which Roach has glitched. Such glitches include flying through the air into a tree, being half through a wall of a house, being on top of the roof of the house, doing pushups and much more! The added imaginative perspective of the NPCs makes the game even better as they watch this magical horse pop out of nowhere, or they see a horse flying through the air. One night their kids could believe that Santa Claus is on their roof, but really when they go outside they see a horse on top of their house! It is comedy gold! The added imaginative perspective of the NPC in video games, make the games better with each play through allowing for more of an immersive gameplay experience. 

The Question without an Answer

The Question without an Answer

Endless Sleep and Real Life Time Travel

Endless Sleep and Real Life Time Travel